OpenEdition acquires DOIs for documents published on its Hypotheses and Calenda platforms

In January 2024, all academic events and blog posts published on Calenda and Hypotheses respectively were issued with a digital object identifier, or DOI. OpenEdition was already assigning DOIs to articles published on OpenEdition Journals and chapters from works published on OpenEdition Books when it decided to extend the process to all documents. The goals behind this are to improve document indexing and the services offered to readers, and make it easier to cite documents. This deliverable was planned as part of the FNSO-funded I-FAIR IR project, the aim of which is to boost the rollout of FAIR principles across all four OpenEdition platforms.

DOIs and OpenEdition

A DOI (Digital Object Identifier) is a unique identifier for digital resources, such as scholarly articles, blog posts, reports, videos, and so on. 

In January 2024, OpenEdition registered over 600,000 DOIs with DataCite, or in other words, all the documents published on Calenda and Hypotheses since 2000 and 2008 respectively. All new documents published will be assigned a DOI within 12 hours of being posted online. 

Offering a persistent citation format

Rolling out the DOIs on Hypotheses includes adding an information section to enable a given digital resource to be cited by reproducing its associated metadata and DOI. 

DOIs on Hypotheses

On Calenda, the section providing information for citing a given announcement now contains the DOI’s URL, rather than Calenda’s URL.  A DOI is more stable and persistent than a URL, which can be modified.

DOIs on Calenda

If a document is deleted, the DOI still provides access to the metadata and information on the document’s status.

Improving document indexing in third-party databases

By enhancing our OAI-PMH repository

OpenEdition’s OAI-PMH repository makes it easier to harvest metadata from all the documents available across the four OpenEdition platforms. The DOIs assigned to blog posts and scholarly events are now linked to the metadata and listed in the repository

In real terms, it means that when a third party harvests the repository to reproduce the metadata for their search engine, for example, the information displayed in search results will be more detailed.

That leads us to Isidore, a search assistant in the humanities and social sciences developed by Huma-Num, which was the first tool to fully ‘re-harvest’ our repository, including documents published online before January 2024, and now displays the DOI of documents. 

Through DataCite’s search engine

DataCite offers an API (Application Programming Interface – an interface for connecting one software application to another to exchange data) for retrieving metadata from a DOI or list of DOIs in JSON format. The metadata can then be used in several ways, for instance to enrich a document referring to another document, or link publications with data.

FAIR Principles

Rolling out the use of DOIs to all our platforms was one of the deliverables planned as part of the FNSO-funded I-FAIR IR project, the aim of which is to boost the rollout of FAIR principles across all our platforms. OpenEdition decided to register the DOIs with DataCite (an international consortium of libraries and services specialized in information science) through INIST (the Institute of Scientific and Technical Information), which is in charge of the French DataCite consortium.

Further information

Interactive DoRANum infographic on DOIs.



Cite this blog post
OpenEdition team (2024, February 22). OpenEdition acquires DOIs for documents published on its Hypotheses and Calenda platforms. Open Electronic Publishing. Retrieved June 18, 2024, from https://doi.org/10.58079/vvs7

You may also like...

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search